Saudi Arabia reports pilgrim infected with MERS

FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, file photo, Egyptian Muslim pilgrims, some wearing masks as a precaution against the Middle East respiratory syndrome, pray after they cast stones at a pillar, symbolizing the stoning of Satan, in a ritual called "Jamarat," the last rite of the annual hajj, in Mina near the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah sacked the country’s health minister on Monday, April 21, 2014, amid a spike in deaths and infections from the virus known as the Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS. The official Saudi Press Agency carried the royal order that said Abdullah al-Rabiah was relieved of his post as Health Minister, and that Labor Minister Adel Faqih will temporarily take over the health minister’s portfolio until a replacement is named. The statement said al-Rabiah is now adviser to the Royal Court. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil, File)RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — In the past 24 hours, Saudi Arabia has reported four new deaths from a Middle East virus related to SARS and 36 more cases of infection, including a Turkish pilgrim in Mecca.



Obama to Russia: More sanctions are 'teed up'

TOKYO (AP) — Accusing Russia of failing to live up to its commitments, President Barack Obama warned Moscow on Thursday that the United States has another round of economic sanctions "teed up" — even as he acknowledged those penalties may do little to influence Vladimir Putin's handling of the crisis in Ukraine.
IMF board to meet April 30 to review aid package for Ukraine

By Elvina Nawaguna WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The International Monetary Fund said on Thursday that Ukraine's government had provided the documentation needed to show whether it had met conditions for a financial aid package and the Fund's board would meet on April 30 to review and consider the matter. The IMF tentatively agreed in late March to provide a $14 billion-$18 billion two-year bailout to help Ukraine recover from months of political and economic turmoil. The IMF board has yet to approve that package. (Reporting by Elvina Nawaguna; Editing by Paul Simao)
Tiny Pacific nation sues 9 nuclear-armed powers

FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2013 file photo, a horse-drawn carriage stands in front of the Peace Palace, seat of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013. The tiny Pacific nation of the Marshall Islands that was used for dozens of U.S. nuclear tests after World War II is taking on the United States and the world’s eight other nuclear-armed nations with an unprecedented lawsuit demanding that they meet their obligations toward disarmament and accusing them of 'flagrant violations' of international law. The suit was filed on Thursday, April 24, 2014 at the ICJ. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)NEW YORK (AP) — The tiny Pacific nation of the Marshall Islands is taking on the United States and the world's eight other nuclear-armed nations with an unprecedented lawsuit demanding that they meet their obligations toward disarmament and accusing them of "flagrant violations" of international law.



US to propose pay-for-priority Internet standards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new Internet rules that would allow Internet service providers to charge content companies for faster delivery of their services over the so-called "last mile" connection to people's homes.


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