Tyson recalls tons of chicken strips for possible metal contamination

Tyson recalls tons of chicken strips for possible metal contaminationTyson Foods Inc is recalling about 69,000 pounds of frozen, ready-to-eat chicken strips that may be contaminated with metal, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said late on Thursday. The department's Food Safety and Inspection Service said https://bit.ly/2UPFfIC it had received two consumer complaints of extraneous material in Tyson's chicken strip products and that there were no reports of illnesses. Tyson, the top U.S. meat processor, is recalling its fully cooked buffalo-style chicken strips fritters, crispy chicken strips and chicken breast strip fritters with a before-use date of Nov. 30, 2019.



Engineering elections? U.S. top court examines electoral map manipulation

Engineering elections? U.S. top court examines electoral map manipulationThanks to partisan gerrymandering - a practice the Supreme Court will examine on Tuesday in two cases that could impact American politics for decades - that is no longer the case. A U.S. House of Representatives district that once covered heavily Democratic Greensboro was reconfigured in 2016, with the voters in the city of 290,000 people inserted into two other districts spanning rural areas with reliable Republican majorities. In adopting the electoral map, the legislature partitioned the campus of North Carolina A&T State University, the nation's largest historically black public college, into two separate districts.



Democrats push financial inclusion as 2020 election race heats up

Democrats push financial inclusion as 2020 election race heats upFollowing the 2008 financial crisis, many banks pulled back from their poorest customers. The shift has had lasting costs for millions of Americans now struggling to access mainstream financial services such as checking accounts and credit cards. The three Democrats, along with Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, have advocated for the U.S. Postal Service to provide banking services.



Climate change's fingerprints are on U.S. Midwest floods: scientists

Climate change's fingerprints are on U.S. Midwest floods: scientistsThe "bomb cyclone" that dumped rain on Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri and killed at least four people now threatens a wider region downstream of swollen rivers and smashed levees. "The atmosphere is pretty close to fully saturated, it's got all the water it can take," said Michael Wehner, a senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Big storms like the bomb cyclone and Hurricane Harvey, which smacked Houston in 2017 with record downpours, are where the impact of climate change can most clearly be seen, he said, adding that climate change's fingerprints were all over the recent storm.



Amid U.S. Midwest flooding, residents in Missouri, Kansas rush to fill sandbags

Amid U.S. Midwest flooding, residents in Missouri, Kansas rush to fill sandbagsFlooding of the Missouri River triggered by last week's so-called "bomb cyclone" storm has already inflicted damage estimated at nearly $1.5 billion in Nebraska, killed at least four people in Nebraska and Iowa and left a man missing below Nebraska's collapsed Spencer Dam. Missouri Governor Mike Parson declared a state of emergency for his state as high water forced evacuations of several small farm communities. Larger towns from St. Joseph to Kansas City braced for additional flooding forecast through the weekend.





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