European carriers suspend more Tel Aviv flights

A arrivals flight board displays various canceled and delayed flights in Ben Gurion International airport a day after the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration imposed a 24-hour restriction on flights after a Hamas rocket landed Tuesday within a mile of the airport, in Tel Aviv, Israel, Wednesday, July 23, 2014. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry flew into Israel's main airport Wednesday despite a Federal Aviation Administration ban in an apparent sign of his determination to achieve a cease-fire agreement in the warring Gaza Strip despite little evidence of progress in ongoing negotiations. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)BERLIN (AP) — Air France and Germany's two largest airlines on Wednesday canceled more flights to Tel Aviv because of ongoing safety concerns amid the fighting between Israel and Hamas.



Supreme Court denies inmate's last-ditch appeal

FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Arizona Department of Corrections shows inmate Joseph Rudolph Wood. The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, July 22, 2014, allowed the Arizona executionof Wood to go forward amid a closely watched First Amendment fight over the secrecy surrounding lethal injection drugs in the country. (AP Photo/Arizona Department of Corrections, File)FLORENCE, Ariz. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court has denied a final, last-ditch appeal of an Arizona murderer seeking a reprieve from execution.



US officials, lawmakers clash over Iraq policy

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senior U.S. officials and lawmakers butted heads Wednesday over the American response to Iraq's expanding Sunni insurgency, with Republicans saying drone strikes should have been authorized months ago and even Democrats questioning the Obama administration's commitment to holding the fractured country together.
AP NewsBreak: Cities to meet with USOC about 2024

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Leaders from the four U.S. cities in the running to bid for the 2024 Summer Games will meet with U.S. Olympic Committee leadership Friday in the first gathering to include representatives from all the major interested parties.
Russian ties, trade lie behind EU sanctions rift

By Robin Emmott BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Germany and Italy have most to lose if the European Union makes good on its threat to impose harsher sanctions on Moscow, while Britain's overseas territories are soaking up the lion's share of capital streaming out of Russia. The picture emerging from United Nations and European Union data shows the impact of restricting trade with Russia would be far from even, with Germany dwarfing others' exposure and those urging sanctions loudest, such as Sweden, having less at stake. Wary of antagonizing its main gas supplier, the EU has used travel bans and asset freezes so far in reaction to Russia's annexation of Crimea and support for separatists in Ukraine.


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